Jesus’ tears

Jesus wept. (John 11:35 KJV)

When Jesus heard that His friend Lazarus had died He made His way to Bethany, where Lazarus had lived.   He told the disciples that Lazarus was sleeping and He must go wake him. The disciples thought Jesus meant literally asleep, but Jesus quickly, and plainly, corrected that notion. In verse 14 Jesus said to them, “Lazarus is dead.” The placing of the words, “Jesus wept” might let the reader believe that He was weeping over Lazarus. While this might be part of the reason, I don’t think it was the primary source of Jesus’ grief. He knew, long before He arrived in Bethany that His friend had died. (Verse 14) He also knew that Lazarus was soon to be raised. Death, I don’t think caused the Savior to weep.

Then what did? I think that Jesus saw the unbelief in those around Him, particularly in Mary, and it hurt Him. Martha had just said the same thing to Him a few moments before, so it was pretty obvious that they had been sitting around talking about this.

This was the Mary who anointed Jesus’ feet with oil and her tears. She was a devoted follower. Yet her first reaction when seeing Jesus was to complain that He was too late to save her brother! Our unbelief hurts the Master. We call ourselves His followers, we call Him Lord, Savior, Master and King, but when trials hit us what do we do? We complain that He didn’t stop the hard time before it happened. Jesus had a purpose in allowing Lazarus to die. It was a Divine purpose that brought souls into the Kingdom and glory to the Father. Mary didn’t know this, but she knew Jesus.

We know Jesus and what He can do. We also know that God’s glory is the overriding purpose in all that He does. When we allow ourselves to be placed into that purpose we will live with an incredible joy, despite the situation we are in. Don’t be a Mary and Martha. Don’t complain, “If only you had been here sooner.” Be thankful and live in His joy.

© 2021 Tim Lehmann. All rights reserved.

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Jesus Changes Everything

Then, leaving her water jar, the woman went back to the town and said to the people, “Come, see a man who told me everything I ever did. Could this be the Messiah?” (John 4:28-29 NIV)

Who doesn’t know the account of Jesus and the woman at the well? If, somehow, you missed it, please review the whole thing at John 4:1 – 42. It’s a wonderful account of how Jesus related to one individual to impact a whole town. Today we are only looking at two verses of this account. To cover that whole story would take hours.

The unnamed woman came to the well. No surprise here, this was the way it was done. Except this woman chose to come to the well at noon. When reading the whole narrative we can see why. She was a shamed woman. The Samaritans were Jews, sort of. They claim to be Jews that follow the Law as written in the first five books of the Old Testament. They believe that after the captivity in Babylon Judaism was corrupted and refuse to follow the Jewish rabbis. So they knew that this woman was a sinner extraordinaire.   Married five times and now living with a man that she wasn’t married to. She was shamed and didn’t associate with the other women in the village. It was most likely a mutual decision. They didn’t want her and she didn’t want to hear their murmuring.

Than Jesus stopped by. Jesus knew exactly when this woman would be drawing water. There was no surprised, “What are you doing here at this time?” when He saw her. It was noon, it was hot and Jesus wanted a drink of water. So he asked for one. Despite being a Jew who would never think of drinking from a cup or ladle that had been used by a Samaritan, Jesus asked her for water. First He talked to her and then He implied that He would use her utensils. Shock after shock. Then Jesus did something supernatural. He became “the man who told me everything I have ever done.” (v29)

This sent the retiring, shameful woman into town telling everyone she could that maybe she found the Messiah! For her, Jesus changed everything.

How about you? Jesus still changes everything. Addicts are set free. The lame are still made whole. The blind are still made to see. Jesus changes everything.

Do you need a change? Talk to Jesus about your situation. Sometimes the change is that He will be walking with you in the middle of the trial. Sometimes He changes the situations to eliminate the trial. Jesus didn’t get rid of the woman’s past, He simply made her past irrelevant.

© 2021 Tim Lehmann. All rights reserved.

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Happy People

Happy are those who reject the advice of evil people, who do not follow the example of sinners or join those who have no use for God. Instead, they find joy in obeying the Law of the LORD, and they study it day and night. They are like trees that grow beside a stream, that bear fruit at the right time, and whose leaves do not dry up. They succeed in everything they do.
But evil people are not like this at all; they are like straw that the wind blows away. Sinners will be condemned by God and kept apart from God’s own people. The righteous are guided and protected by the LORD, but the evil are on the way to their doom.
(Psalms chapter 1 GNB)

This starts like something Jesus said on the Sermon on the Mount. But ends like a Proverb. Either way you look at it, it’s sound advice. There’s really not a lot of explanation needed with this chapter (yes, this is the whole chapter). The question is, “Who are you?” Are you the one who delights in the Law (Words and teachings of the Bible) and who will be planted in a stable and healthy spiritual environment?

Or are you the one who scoffs and rejects Jesus? Know that if you are the latter, your end will not be good. You might think you are happy now, and for a time your will enjoy life. Just remember, life is eternal. The question is where, and with whom, will you spend eternity?

© 2021 Tim Lehmann. All rights reserved.

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The Lord Is My Shepherd

The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures. He leads me beside still waters. He restores my soul. He leads me in paths of righteousness for his name’s sake. Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me. (Psalm 23:1-4 ESV)

We all know these verses and many of us have even memorized them from the time we were children. They are often used as a comfort to those grieving the loss of a loved one. I want us to take another look at these familiar verses in a new light. Lets see them as a prayer!

You, Lord, are my Shepherd. Because of your provision I shall never want. You allow me to rest in safe, comfortable places. You restore my soul. Jesus, You lead me in the path of righteousness so the that Your name may be glorified. Even when I face trials and maybe even death, I won’t be afraid because Your power and Your promises comfort me.

Now we have a better perspective of what David was saying when he wrote this Psalm. It is a song of praise at what God has done and is doing. I believe that if we took a few seconds every morning to thank Jesus for what He has done and is doing in our lives then we will have a better day. I know for a certainty that it is what He wants us to do.

© 2021 Tim Lehmann. All rights reserved.

Thank you for your support of this ministry. Please “LIKE” and “SHARE” this blog and if you feel led, your financial gifts are truly appreciated.

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